Aaron: June 2009 Archives

For those of you folks that read the ARAM rehab post, followed my request to look at this post, I thank you, because I have taken a lot of time to research this, and finally found someone else doing the same research, Bill James.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2009/writers/joe_posnanski/06/29/james.33/index.html?eref=si_mlb

To summarize the article, Bill James lists a mix of 33 players (obviously, because his article was about the decline of age 33, so it wasn't a coincidence). Names such as Mickey Mantle, Cepeda, McCovey, Brett, Murray, Kaline, Hack Wilson, Duke Snider, Jason Giambi, Ivan Rodriguez, and Albert Belle adorn the list. He shows all of their stats at age 32 compared to age 33, and you notice a significant drop-off.

I've been saying on here for quite sometime now that the prime years of a hitter are about age 26 to 32 years old, and after that, it drops off considerably. Bat speed decreases, injuries mount up, speed on the basepaths diminishes ...

I'll spare you all the long read, and just summarize what I posted in the Talkin' Live today in Game 1 against the White Sox.

Basically, what I said in my long post there, was that this team is FILLED with inconsistent performers. I backed up everything with stats of players that I thought were consistent throughout their careers like Dunn, Teixeria, Abreu, Ibanez, Ray Durham, and Kenny Lofton, and how Lee, Soriano, and Bradley miss completely on the key statistics which measure consistency: avg, OBP, hr, RBI. If you're making consistent contact with the baseball, and your stats aren't a by-product of dumb luck (as seems to be the case with Lee, Soriano, and Bradley in their career years before they signed contracts with us), then it'll show particularly in your avg and OBP, where hr and RBI are essentially a by-product of that.

But since Hendry already blew it with Miles and Bradley, we have no choice but to look internally for different options, especially conside ...

Tim Wheeler-OF: The left-handed center fielder is another potential leadoff hitter in center field. He's a five-tool outfielder, although none of his skills really jump out as being all that impressive. At the plate, he shows good plate discipline and an ability to make consistent contact. His power isn't that impressive yet, but at 6'4", 195 lbs., scouts believe he could develop at least fair power as he progresses. He has a slight hitch in his swing, but he has very quick wrists that compensate. His speed is good and he stole 15 bases in 17 attempts this season. Wheeler was dominating at the plate this season, hitting .385 with a .494 OBP and 18 home runs, but unfortunately most of that cam against relatively weak WAC competition. Where Wheeler goes in the draft is a bit of a mystery, as rumors have him linked as high as the Rockies at #11 or lasting all the way to the Cubs at #31. My gut tells me that Wheeler is long gone by the time the Cubs pick, but if he's still there, the Cu ...

This is a continuation of my post in Talkin' Live...

I think we can all agree that this season is toast. We are at .500, we have lost something like 13 of 15 or whatever it is. We have no closer. We have no go-to RBI man. We have only one regular (Fukudome) hitting over .300, and only Theriot is anywhere NEAR .300 as far as other regulars are concerned.

Here's what I propose:
1)get ownership situation completed
2)fire Hendry immediately for what he's done
3)DFA/trade the following: Cotts (even though he's at AAA), Patton, Gregg, Heilman, Lee, Miles, Soto (face it, he's the second coming of Jerome Walton), Harden (b/c we won't sign him next year anyhow), Lilly (because he actually has value and we can replenish the system), Blanco, Bradley (tell him if he doesn't accept a trade, he sits the bench and faces embarrassment) Theriot (because he also has value), and you see if Soriano will waive his no trade (if so, then you gauge the market...by no mean ...