Cubs Reportedly Expect to Trade Jason Hammel in the Next Two Weeks

According to a report Thursday from Jayson Stark, teams that have spoken with the Cubs about Jason Hammel expect the veteran right hander to be traded in the next two weeks. There has been a lot of speculation of late that the front office would like to trade Hammel first and help set the market for a possible Jeff Samardzija trade.

Several teams are thought to be interested in Jason Hammel and many of those same teams are also believed to be interested in Jeff Samardzija.

The Mariners are reportedly at the top of the list of teams interested in acquiring Jason Hammel that includes the Blue Jays, Orioles, Yankees, White Sox, Royals, Angels, Braves and Giants.

As for what the Cubs might be able to acquire in return for Hammel, the general consensus is the front office might be able to land a similar package (Jake Arrieta and Pedro Strop) to the one they received for Scott Feldman and Steve Clevenger last July 2. But Peter Gammons thinks the Cubs could receive more in return for Hammel after the way he’s pitched this season.

The Cubs obviously have not said they plan to trade Jason Hammel or when a possible deal could occur. Jed Hoyer mentioned Friday that conversations start with other teams after the draft and pick up intensity over the course of the next 45 days.

“Obviously the busiest two days of the year are the 30th and 31st of July,” Hoyer told David Kaplan and David Haugh. “But that said, by the time you get to that point there has been a ton of dialogue. Sometimes it takes a deadline to get a deal done. Sometimes it just takes a team that feels like Baltimore last year with [Scott] Feldman, I have a need and I want to get the most starts out of this guy as I possibly can so I am willing to sort of pay the deadline price a little bit early.”

Jim Bowden asked Jed Hoyer during an interview Thursday on Inside Pitch (MLB Network Radio/SiriusXM Radio) if Jason Hammel was more likely to get traded than Jeff Samardzija. Hoyer did not specifically say Hammel would be traded, but he alluded to the fact that he will be dealt prior to the deadline.

“We don’t control him beyond this year, so with Jason [Hammel] it is obviously a decision point,” Hoyer said. “As far as whether we talk about an extension or we talk about trading him, we don’t … as with Jeff [Samardzija] we have him next year under arbitration. Obviously with Jason there is not an option on that contract. So I think that does push the decision up, potentially a little faster.”

Jed Hoyer also talked about the Cubs signing starting pitchers on short-term contracts and being able to them into long-term assets. But Hoyer admitted to Jim Bowden and Casey Stern on Thursday that the days of the Cubs signing players for the perceived purpose of trading them have to come to an end.

“I think it has served us well. We’ve bought in guys that we feel really good about for our pitching infrastructure. Our pitching coach Chris Bosio, Mike Borzello does a great job with our game planning,” Hoyer said. “Our infrastructure is really good from a pitching stand point. I think it served Paul [Maholm] really well. Scott Feldman really enjoyed working with Chris Bosio and I think Jason [Hammel] does too. The ability to bring these guys in, in some ways we all benefit. These guys come in and have really good years and it’s helped them in the market. I know it helped Scott [Feldman] get a really good deal with the Astros. The only thing I don’t like about it is that in Spring Training people were asking Jason Hammel about getting traded and that is something that we have to, as an organization and that is really on Theo and me, we have to end that. We have to be a good enough team where people don’t start asking those questions in Spring Training about ‘Are you here to be moved?’ That’s on us to get more competitive to avoid those questions.”

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  • Eugene Debs

    It’s like dumping a good mate because you’re searching for “the one.” Regret morphs into a life of loneliness as you look back and remember the days when you actually wanted what you now give away.

    • Tony_H

      I agree, I sit around wondering why our rotation isn’t:

      1. Samardzija
      2. Garza
      3. Dempster (we could have kept him going I’m sure)
      4. Feldman
      5. Maholm

      We would be at least one more win than we have now…right?

      • Eugene Debs

        I’m talking about Hammel.

        • Tony_H

          I know, but he will fall into the same class as Feldman and Maholm by next season.

          • Eugene Debs

            He could, sure. But unlike those two guys, Hammel was always a top prospect with “good stuff.” Feldman and particularly Maholm were never “studs.”

          • Tony_H

            Not sure I think “stud” when I see Hammel. He was a 10th round draft pick and his highest prospect ranking was 79th before 2006, which is better than I expected to see, but it is not like he was a top prospect all the way up and to the majors.

            I agree on Bosio. I feel like we could fill BOR spots every year with guys like this.

          • Eugene Debs

            Yeah, stud was a bit of a reach. But, we’ll do backflips if we get a guy ranked top 150 for him, so comparatively, he’s a stud-lite.

          • mutantbeast

            Maholm was a 1st round draft pick. Somebody thought he could become one. Part of his problem was he was a GB pitcher playing with a terrible IF defense in Pittspuke. Funny how he got bettter when he got to the Cubs.

          • SuzyS

            Gee, Barney had value?

          • Eugene Debs

            I tell you though, it just shows how good Chris Bosio is that he keeps helping these guys.

      • SuzyS

        I don’t think Demp’s sabbatical has anything to do with baseball. I’m pretty sure it has to do with the fact that he’s financially set and his daughter’s challenging situation healthwise.

        • Tony_H

          Sorry Suzy, I do know that, was being a little tongue in cheek there by saying I am sure we could have kept him going.

      • cubtex

        I just dream of EJAX for 2 more years with Wood and no frontline starter on the horizon.

        • Tony_H

          You have spent the morning attacking anyone who disagrees with your opinion. Don’t we have a right to post our thoughts freely without fear of attacks?

          • cubtex

            where are these attacks you so freely mention?

          • http://chicagocubsonline.com/ Neil

            You guys have gone back and forth for two days. And before you ask, I am responding to you because you left the last comment.

            Let’s move away from the ‘attacking conversation’. It has been going in all different directions, as I said for two days.

            Everyone is more than welcome to debate the Cubs, the front office and the minor leagues. We are not going to agree on all subjects. I do, however, expect all of the posters to follow the site rules and to respect one another. Disagreements are welcome, conversations and discussion are more than welcome. Disrespect is not.

          • Bryan

            Am getting so tired sometimes of the BS on this site. “Grown ups” acting like bickering children. Everyone on this site is a true Cubs fans…can we not respect that, despite differences of opinions. Every darn day, the same stuff here.

      • GaryLeeT

        The Cubs could have lost just as many games with them.

        • Tony_H

          That was my point, their record wouldn’t have improved, if we had kept these guys and then we wouldn’t have the players we received in trade.

          • GaryLeeT

            Or, they could have settled for the high draft picks, and replaced those pitchers by being more aggressive in the free agent market. Like landing a Darvish, and Tanaka. But that strategy is reserved for teams with money.

  • Tony_H

    Good overview of the 3 sellers in this market in the Jayson Stark article at the beginning.

    “So Samardzija is probably going to be somebody’s signature late-July purchase — and, very possibly, for a package closer to Price’s than you might suspect.

    Remember, Samardzija is going to make about half as much money over the next season and a half as Price (who’s earning $14 million this year, to Samardzija’s $5.345 million). And the Cubs can do what the Rays can’t — stoke an official AL East bidding war to up the ante.”

    • Eugene Debs

      I like Jayson’s take on our deadline situation.

  • mutantbeast

    I still like the possability of getting Paxton for Hammel and then seeing About Zimmer plus others for Spellcheck.

    • Denver Mike

      I’m really hoping Seattle overpays with a Paxton for Hammel swap, but I fear I’m getting my hopes a little too high. That kid can pitch (when healthy).

  • SuzyS

    The important tidbit in this article is: “…the days of the Cubs signing players with the perceived purpose of trading them has come to end.” (Hoyer talking with Jim Bowden and Casey Stern.
    This is the progression I expected…but it is really nice to hear it verbalized.
    The Cubs are finally switching gears and preparing to actually win.

    • cubtex

      Finally I hope. The Astros are a year ahead of the Cubs plan and they have stopped. They have Springer,Singleton and Correira coming shortly. I heard Richard Justice talk about the same thing about where the Stros are.

      • GaryLeeT

        And the Marlins stopped the year before. The Cubs are purposely drawing out the process for no other reason than to save money.

        • Tony_H

          No, they are at different parts of the process.

          • GaryLeeT

            Sadly, the Marlins, and Astros started after the Cubs, but are ahead them in the process.

          • Tony_H

            LOL, what year are you using for each team?

            Cubs was 2012 season, Theo’s 1st season.

          • GaryLeeT

            You know I count 2011 as the first year of the rebuild, and you are not changing my mind on that. They were shedding players, and salary that year. Nothing less than if Theo had been there.

          • Tony_H

            You can have your opinion, but I have never seen anyone else say this or even try to make this case. JH was not rebuilding he was trying to still win and was maxed out on salary and it was called a creative way to add players to still try and win. Of course 2010 and 2011 were both years we knew had no chance, yet most people questioned why he was still trying to go for it both years.

          • GaryLeeT

            Perhaps if looked over the 2011 transactions from June on, you might be enlightened, but I am not holding out hope.

          • Tony_H

            Sorry but when you trade 4 of the Top 10 or so prospects from your team to get a SP like Garza, it is done to win now.

            Plus you are basing this on JH actually trading away players after he is out of the playoffs with players that were going to be gone anyway. All teams do this with their players who are about to be FA’s if the player is better off being traded than extended. That doesn’t mean he was rebuilding.

          • GaryLeeT

            That’s my point. If they were still going for it, they would have extended Lilly, but they didn’t. Guess why? That’s right, the rebuilding process had started.

          • Tony_H

            Ted Lilly was traded away in 2010 and it wasn’t to start a rebuild of anything, it was because he had maxed out his credit card and had to sell something to pay the bill.

          • GaryLeeT

            Nothing says going for it like naming Quade as your next manager. The more I think about it, it really started in 2010.

          • GaryLeeT

            I am sorry, that was 2010. But they were going for then too. Right?

          • GaryLeeT

            “Sorry but when you trade 4 of the Top 10 or so prospects from your team to get a SP like Garza, it is done to win now.”

            If he had traded for Doc Halladay you might have a point, but he traded inferior prospects for a proven starting pitcher with 2 controllable years left. That’s just a smart move. Your argument holds no water.

          • Tony_H

            http://bleacherreport.com/articles/566316-chicago-cubs-trade-for-matt-garza-a-fine-move-for-a-desperate-jim-hendry

            “Heading into the winter of 2010-11, most fans and experts knew that the Cubs did not have much money to invest. They’d have to sign players on a budget and would have to do much of their improvement through trade.”

            “Make no mistake about it, Friday’s trade shows that the Cubs plan to contend in 2011. Jim Hendry knows what’s at stake this season and has acted accordingly, with three strong moves despite very little fiscal flexibility.”

            http://www.sbnation.com/2011/8/19/2372542/jim-hendry-fired-matt-garza-trade

            “At first blush, trading for Matt Garza heading into the 2011 season seemed odd from the Cubs’ perspective. Coming off a 2010 season in which they finished 75-87 and placed fifth in the NL Central, general manager Jim Hendry made a win-now move for a team that should have been acquiring the kinds of players they dealt away.

            The roster was mostly full of older players — while Starlin Castro was just 20 years old in 2010, Geovany Soto was the only other regular younger than 30. Tyler Colvin was just 24, but wasn’t considered an impact player. The rotation was no different: 27-year-oldTom Gorzelanny wasn’t considered much more than back-end rotation filler, and Randy Wells, also 27, was average at best. Those were the “kids” on the pitching staff.

            This older team was also expensive, with a $144 million payroll in 2010. With veterans likeAramis Ramirez, Ryan Dempster, Marlon Byrd, and Carlos Zambrano around — all players with some degree of trade value — it’s a wonder the Cubs didn’t take the time to reload via trade in order to find pieces for the next great Chicago squad. Instead, the Cubs helped the Rays utilize that strategy, taking Matt Garza off of their hands in order to bolster their own rotation, but at the cost of Chris Archer, Hak-Ju Lee, Robinson Chirinos, Sam Fuld, and Brandon Guyer.”

          • GaryLeeT

            You are giving me Marc’s opinion, which I could care less about. I made my case for the Garza trade happening during a rebuild, and in the end, it yielded much more than they gave up. AGAIN, getting a good young pitcher with controllable years in return for unproven prospects, is NOT going for it, because the same move would made sense during a rebuild. Look, the first order of business when Ricketts took over was to slash the payroll, NOT “let’s go for it”.

          • triple

            You seriously can’t believe that? So you rebuild by trading your top prospects for pitching that will be hitting 30. I’m sorry, but rebuilding is trading your pitchers who are hitting 30 for top prospects. You’ve got that ass-backwards! Your opinion, I mean…

          • GaryLeeT

            I said I wouldn’t reply to you, because of comments just like this. However, I thought you might need a reminder as to why I don’t. Garza (with good post-season performances) was 27 when he was traded to the Cubs with 2 controllable years. That could be considered a pitcher of the future to build around. They Gave up nobody of consequence except for Archer, who has yet to prove that the trade was a mistake. Sorry, I just don’t have the time to respond to poorly thought out responses like the one you just spat out.

          • triple

            tldr

        • Roll

          Everyday Ricketts can draw out the process on spending aka payroll and construction is another day closer to new TV revenue and prospects are MLB ready.

  • Tony_H

    ESPN did a projected All-Star team based on WAR.

    http://espn.go.com/mlb/playerratings/_/type/allstarprojections

    Anthony Rizzo was the only batter to make it with Samardzija and Hammel on the team for pitchers.

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